FAMOUS QUOTES: WHAT ARE MY FAVORITE AND WHAT THEY MEAN TO ME

Abraham Lincolcn Statue

“We hold these truths to be self-evident.” “That all men are created equal.” 

-DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE


We all have some favorite quotes and what they mean to each of us. They might be quotes that we just love to hear, or even quotes that motivate us to keep persevering. Some of those quotes could be a bible versus, “I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me.” Or it can be from a literary, “I would have rather been born blind, than to have been given sight and lack vision” (Helen Keller). And with that said, I would like to present my own quotes that I love, which resonate with me. One comes from Thomas Edison, the other Marianne Williamson, and the third is Martin Luther King Jr.

Now, the first is Thomas Edison, who had many many quotes. But the quote that I recently found that Thomas Edison made was, “Many of life’s failures are people who didn’t realize how close they were to success when they gave up.” This statement is Image result for edisonalways coming into my mind every time I think about giving up in life on my writing. Writing is such a daunting task of working to succeed. You are going to have success, and you’re going to have failure along the way. But to me, I have yet to see those successes. And then I think about how long I have been writing. 2013 is the year I officially decided to become a writer. I gave myself on a ten year window to break into the industry as a screenwriter and playwright. Meanwhile I am writing my blog everyday and my books as well.

So, what does any of this have to do with Thomas Edison? Well, giving up, and not realizing how close you might have been when you gave up. I have written five full length screenplays, self-published two books, written 400 blog posts in the past two and a half years, and two short film scripts; one script turned into a short film. And still, I have been working to create other projects to keep myself in that creative mode. So if I give in now, it will have been for nothing. Not just my past four to five years, but the time put into my work. Don’t give up when you are so close. So close, if you knew how close, you might even put more time into your work. And that is why Edison’s quote screams so loud to me.

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MARIANNE WILLIAMSON, 1992

But my second quote is from Marianne Williamson from her book, “A Return to Love.” The famous quote from the book is, “Our Deepest Fears.” “Not that we inadequate; our deepest fear is that we powerful beyond measure.” “It is our light not our darkness that most frightens us.” “We look in the mirror and ask ourselves, who am I to be talented, gorgeous, fabulous; who are you not to be.” “There is nothing enlightened about shrinking so that others won’t feel insecure when they’re around you.” “We were all meant to shine as children do.” “You were made to manifest the glory of God that is within you.” “It’s not in some of us, it’s in everyone.” “And as you let your own light shine, you will unconsciously give others permission to do the same.” “When you are liberated from your own fears.” “Your presence will automatically liberate others.”

I could not pick just one aspect of that quote, but I had to choose the entire passage. Because the first part speaks of being inadequate yet you really are afraid of your own powers. We have this fear because once you succeed, people are going to expect more, and what happens if you can’t give them more. So we fear the attempt because of the expectations that come with it. Then the passage details us questioning why us. But why not us? We as the passage says don’t want people to feel insecure around us. But you should never dumb yourself down for the sake of fitting in, or this notion your brilliance makes others uncomfortable.  You might just have a golden nugget of advice that the people need. And the quote further goes on to let people know we all have the powers to succeed. But once you let that inner you shine, it gives courage to others to step up. Why, because your willingness to not give up and fight makes them exuberate a little less fear as well. Because if you can do it, it makes them feel the same way.

Great quote, giving me an even greater sense of purpose. But there is still one more quote I love. And it was from civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. He didn’t make this a public speech, yet stated this quote among a small group of friends. He said, “I feel as if I am integrating my people into a burning building.” AsImage result for mlk a child I couldn’t understand what that meant. But as an adult, I see old footage of the time period. People wanted him dead, why. Just because he wanted people to vote, have a fair chance at jobs, eliminate Jim Crow laws (which were an extension of slavery), and send children to schools of their choice. But the backlash was often so brutal you think to yourself. “Is this worth it?” “Do I really want my family to integrate.” “Maybe segregation is best.”

Because if you want to vote and someone is willing to kill. Or willing to kill for you drinking from the same water fountain or eating in the same restaurant, should I assimilate. Because when you assimilate, you’re introducing that element into your life, to your children, and your community. It’s not everyone, yet it’s enough to make you think twice. Meaning, you might think you’re shutting me out, but you might actually be doing me a favor. Coming from a man who knew he could die for going against the grain, it was intriguing to hear a statement where even he questioned the movement. In the end, we all live by quotes, or have a love for some type of quote. But whatever the case, famous quotes have and will always be an aspect of our lives.


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I OWE IT TO YOU: WHY NEVER FORGETTING THOSE WHO FOUGHT FOR YOUR RIGHTS IS IMPORTANT

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“For those who died, I thank you.”


As a young man born in the year 1987, I did not experience those turbulent years of the Civil Rights Movement. Now my parents on the other hand saw the tail end, and there’s of course the generations prior. So as a child, I grew up going to school, eating where I wanted, and using public restrooms. Not once did I understand how I got to that point. All I knew is that when someone needed to go to the bathroom, you went. But what I didn’t know until my mother sat down and talked with me, is that it was not always like that in America. And that I should never forget why I am able to do what I do.

And she reminded of this because for the longest there were not only demographics of citizens, but an entire systematic push to keep me from having the basics of necessities. So as I went to school, I always performed well academically because she reminded me at one time how illegal it was for me to go Image result for white onlyto the schools I went to in America. Whenever I used a restroom, she not only told me, but we watched the video footage of Black men and women being attacked just for trying to consume a meal or urinate at public rest stops. So my reason for not getting into trouble is not mainly because of the enforcement of the judicial system, but more so by way of these men and women who died. There are unmarked graves of countless Black people who gave their lives, a lot of which you will never know their names.

So now as an adult, I do so much because they really didn’t have to pave that way. Still today, some of those individuals from that time period are here with us. People who were either teenagers or adults in the fight. And even at times when I see things differently than they do, I can never hate. I can never hate those who Image result for civil rights movementsacrificed so much for me. And no, these men were not the reason I got into my college of choice or landed a job I wanted. But it was because the pressure they placed that made companies even look in my direction. America didn’t want me to have those rights, and had it not been for these men and women, how long would Jim Crow have really lasted. 90 years,  100 years, 200 years; when was the appropriate time to end segregation.

We all would like to think that those types of events had to end, but why? If not for fighting for rights, whose to say? You have of course the critics, yet their voices are to a great degree irrelevant to me. A country tells you to go fight and defend your country, but when you return don’t sit at this table counter. Then you can’t Image result for al and jessesay my country, because in my country you eat where you choose. Otherwise it’s your country, and if I am the lesser, then why are you depending on a lesser to fight for what is yours. So thanks to the men and women who challenged the ideologies of what I am and what was expected of me. For it was you who reminded me before you’re Black, you’re a man, and before that you’re human. You weren’t fighting for my freedom of speech, but my freedom to exist. You did in the past, and still in the present. So despite what the critics think and feel you have my love and respect.

In the end, I dedicate this life of mine to you. Those who fought who are still alive and to those who died in the struggle: Al Sharpton, Alex Haley, Andrew Young, Angela Davis, Assata Shakur, Barack H. Obama, Bobby Seale, Booker T. Washington, Cornel West, Denmark Vesey, Dick Gregory, Dred Scott, Eldridge Cleaver, Elijah Muhammad, Fred Hampton, Frederick Douglass, Gabriel Prosser, George Washington Carver, Harriet Tubman, Harry Belafonte, Huey P.Image result for black historyNewton, Ida B. Wells, Jackie Robinson, James Baldwin, James Meredith, James Weldon Johnson, Jesse Jackson, Jim Brown, John Lewis, Kathleen Cleaver, Louis Farrakhan, Madam C. J. Walker, Malcolm X, Marcus Garvey, Martin Luther King Jr., Mary McLeod Bethune, Maya Angelou, Maxine Waters, Medgar Evers, Muhammad Ali, Nat Turner, Ralph Abernathy, Rosa Parks, Shirley Chisholm, Sojourner Truth, Stokely Carmichael, Thurgood Marshall, W. E. B. Du Bois, and many others who were lesser known or even unknown, yet gave their lives for me. I love you, “WE” love you.


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JUNETEENTH DAY: WHERE ARE WE NOW FROM THEN

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“The descendants of blood, sweat, and tears, still going strong.”


Today marks the 152nd anniversary in which the first Juneteenth Day celebration was held in Galveston, Texas. And for those of you that are unfamiliar with Juneteenth, it is the celebration that marks the freedom of slaves in the United States. And in this time period, so much has taken place in the United States. From leaving slavery and entering Jim Crow south to electing the the United States first Black president into office. There has been a lot of ups and down over the past 150 years, but what has changed? Recently, there was an acquittal of yet another police officer for shooting and unarmed Black male.

But, the question I want to ask for this post is, what further must be done to insure that we are not relegated to the past. Now I know slavery is a jump, but man has a way of repeating history. And it may not even be us, but someone else. Which is why the conversations should always be around because once we forget, it is bound to happen again. I know for a fact I don’t want to wind-up back in subjugation. Now, some may say, that is just ludicrous. We are in a different time period than the past, and another slave trade could not possibly happen. Yes, that is true, I don’t see another slave trade in America, but what about somewhere else?

What about sex slavery? Sex slavery is not only still a big issue, but there has been cases of this in United States. Holding people against their will and making them sell themselves in the form of sex for payment. The person gets no money and the other using them takes everything. Yet even though this is a problem, it is not the biggest concern of Black people or anybody else for that matter in America. So concerning Black people in America, what does our future hold for us? Will things get better in the community or will they worsen?

I have been taking notice to the state of Black America, and I would love to think that the community is getting better. But it’s hard to see because in the now, it doesn’t seem that way. It seems as if the issues are worsening, especially with the slow economics of America. I don’t like being pessimistic, but it’s tough to say. And in the end, that is the reality as it pertains to our future. Because there are so many White men and women struggling themselves, so I know we are having hard times. But hopefully I am just being paranoid, and the future holds something for us. If not, we could see a role back of everything we have fought for in this country.


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1619: HOW FAR HAVE WE COME AS AFRICAN AMERICANS

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“What happens when identity has to be recreated?”


Two years from now will be the year 2019, which will mark the 400 year period since the first Africans were brought to America. So much between then and now has happened, and the question now remains. How far have Black people come in America and how far do we still need to go? Let’s take a look in the past for just a moment. Imagine, each person, coming from their respective tribes, with their respective cultures. Being dragged to a new land, not knowing what was in store once you got there. Trying to understand why looking out into the sea you can’t find the river banks from which you came to return back home. And now you’re in this new place for life, with people you don’t know.

Fast forward to today, where we have been for almost 400 years. But, we have really only had rights since about the early 1970’s. That means African Americans have been experiencing freedom for roughly 45 – 50 years. You america, architecture, famousmight say, how so? Well, freedom allows you to vote, which we couldn’t do until coming into the 1970’s from the 1960’s. Freedom says you can go to any school you want to attend. But in the 1970’s and even as early as the 1980’s institutions were resistant in letting Blacks attend. Freedom grants you housing wherever you want to live, which is even more recent than the right to vote. Freedom grants the privilege to marry who you want without question. Laws on books forbid interracial marriage in various states in this country. The only progressive environment that has moved with more pace has been sports and the United States Armed Forces.

But what still needs to happen. Because we have poor education in inner city communities. There is a disproportionate number of violent crimes and a breakdown of the family. What’s interesting is that this is more of a recent phenomenon. If you look into the past, two parent households were the norm in the Black community. Black people had close nit communities, crime was nearly nonexistent, and overall morale was in tack. So what does that mean, we have to back track and lose our rights again to have control over our communities. Is there some sort of trade off, “You go back to segregation and then life will change.” Or is it more simple than that?

For example, I look at Chicago, a city that is plagued with crime, and also my father’s place of birth. And he has stated that it is a mixture of heavy Whtie and Black Police Car on Roadgang recruitment and lack of establishment by the law because of politicians not doing their jobs. It has been a rogue city for quite some time and with more and more schools closing, yet children are not being placed in other districts, problems are going to really climb. Which brings me to my next question. If schools are closing and countless kids are left in these inner city areas without a school home, should we start to home school as a community? Should Black people disregard the public school system in cities like Chicago? I mean, they’re shutting them down anyways, why not.

And that is the lead in to my next question, What is in the future? America is changing more and more everyday, and if we are not prepared issues will worsen. And not really on just a racial side, but economic. In today’s society, there is still not adequate access in poor areas to a lot of opportunities. Or is it? Black people are one of the largest demographics of smart phone users. That is a tool for learning all on it’s own. Which brings me to the next phase, putting yourself in the know. Those who are willing to put themselves in the know can and will elevate no matter what their economic circumstance or ethnic background. Having that mobile device means you do now have access to a lot of opportunities.

You may say how so? Well, this is not your mother and father or grandparents generation. Google search engine and YouTube has allowed access to what was once the unknown the know. For example, I Black Samsung Tablet on Google Pagelearned to write screenplays, my books, setup my website, and build social media all through tutorials on YouTube and searching through Google. So if we are big smart phone users, then we have the access in hand. All it takes is the attempt to sit and learn. Open yourself up to the opportunities that lie ahead. So, in the end, we have to do something. Life is getting harder by the day; and not just for us, everyone. Adjusting to the major technological shifts that will happen is a must in succeeding in life. If you are not bent on learning and broadening your base, then that America dream you want will no be anywhere within your sights.


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GENERATION FRUSTRATION: WHY WE AS A YOUNG BLACK DEMOGRAPHIC CARRY SUCH ANGER

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“Where does it all come from?”


Ever see the crime rate in the inner cities throughout the country? You ever wonder where so much of this rage comes from? The frustrations comes from a multitude of issues in the community. It’s not just one thing to observe when trying to figure out why this exist. From the gun violence in the community to the rioting when the police shoot an innocent Black male. This rage comes from internal struggle as well as external struggles. But it’s not indicative of who we are as a people. The black community didn’t have these high crime rates during the 1920’s, 30’s, 40’s, 50’s, or even the 60’s. And this was a time period when we barely had rights in America. Well, what happened?

I’ll say the first issue that came about was actually a positive as well. That double edge sword was the Civil Rights Bills passed in the 1960’s. After this time period Black people had this sense of accomplishment. We felt like the work had been complete. Yet, during the Civil Rights Movement, we had our own communities. Black people had our own businesses, schools, hospitals, and social programs. That Black owned mind-frame shifted after the movement. We thought to ourselves, “Why all the Black stuff, we are free now.” Then, communities dried up as Black people left our urban environments to take solace in upper middle or upper class predominantly White neighborhoods. So money left the community, while at the same time spending was poured outward. Whereas in the past money was circulated through the community.

What happened next, coming into the 1970’s as money left, narcotics took hold. The combination of Heroine met Cocaine, led to high crime rates and bombed out buildings. Fatherless homes left Black women dependent on welfare. Which leads into my next reason for the rage. The lack of a co-parenting  situation that made the women both mother and father. Initially Black men were gone from the house for a few hours. Why, well the family needed money from the welfare system. Then hours to days, days to weeks, and then weeks to months. In no time fathers were gone, beginning to get hooked on drugs and alcohol, while women were the new leaders of the community. Now we have this pride in the woman doing it all, when in reality it takes more than just Black women to keep young Black men out of trouble.

Men and women have different skills, thought processes, and emotions. So it’s no wonder why Black women have had such a tough time raising children alone; especially connecting young Black males. So, with no help and forced to work long hours to provide for the family, more than ever the term latch key kid came into play. With her at work and no father around, young Black males turned to gangs as a means of creating bonds with each other they weren’t receiving at home. Gangs started battling for turf over other gangs which were predominantly Black, leading to an even higher crime rate than before. This time was known as the Crack Cocaine years of the 1980’s and 90’s. Which leads to the rage as well of a generation.

Drug trafficking was an issue coming from the 1960’s throughout the 70’s, but nothing was like Crack. Crack took communities deviations down to nothing. KKK were far removed from our communities, while we took over where they left off. Black women who could have been beauty pageant contestants were taken down by Crack. Hair matted on their heads, eyes blood shot red, skull caps & ripped t-shirts, bodily scares from syringe use and scratching, and diseases stemming from drug use. Women who could have been doctors, lawyers, engineers, educators, were taken down by drugs. Black males were dying and getting hit with conspiracy charges and sent to prison for decades, as well as life sentences.

Then the 1990’s came and went, leading into the 2000’s. After a few decades of mayhem, we felt through this past 90’s into the 2000’s this sense of accomplishment as well. But entertainment became bigger influences than ever. Hip Hop hit in the 90’s and early 2000’s, making these men bigger influences than the Civil Rights leaders of the past. And here is another aspect of the rage from young Black males and females. Our entertainment was now raising us, and we would base more and more off of tangibles then intangibles. Boys were more encouraged to be players and pimps than boyfriends and husbands. And Black women were prompted to chase after ballers over day-to-day working men. So now, pickings are slim because expectations became so unrealistic.

So the relationship between Black men and women was even more fragmented. Then in 2008, the United States elected its first Black president Barack H. Obama. Black people flocked to Washington D.C. from all across the country for his inauguration. That sense of accomplishment reemerged and for the past eight years, we felt success. He, a Noble Peace Prize winner, and his wife Michelle Obama was inspirational as well through her public persona. After they left the White House, people geared themselves for Hilary Clinton, the first woman. But the nation elected Donald J. Trump in the year 2016. A man who pulled no punches on how he spoke. Unapologetic and aggression was enough to make him president. And that feeling of hurt emerged from the Black community. Hate crimes rose and everything felt bleak.

And in the end, that’s the feeling of rage from the Black youth of today. We have constantly been told things are different, but don’t feel different. My millennial generation and generation Y were raised into a community of crime and poverty. We feel lied to and with a feeling of limited opportunities, the rage rises. But there is a flip side to the rage. Trump has also had an inverse effect in other ways. Consciousness among young twenty somethings have risen as well. We may be headed toward another Black Renaissance like that of 1930’s Harlem. So with all the anger and frustration, we need more and more consciousness, especially in this troubling time.

1960’S – CADILLACS, LINCOLNS, AND CHEVY’S: A DECADE OF SOLID GOLD SOUL

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“Not my generation, but my muse.”

From 1960 to 1969 was a decade of soulful music that may not have defined my generation, but I love it nonetheless. For me, being born in the 1980’s, 1960 was the year my mother was born. From the sounds of Ray Charles singing hits like Georgia On My Mind, a state that he refused to play a concert because of the Jim Crow laws of the south. A move that created tension toward him for years to come. But was it all about the Jim Crow Image result for ray charles 1960south? No, because the year 1961 brought hits like Etta James, At Last. A love song that anyone who has been hit by cupid’s arrow can relate to. And that same year Ray Charles would return with yet another hit song, Hit The Road Jack. A track that spans just over two minutes, but sends a powerful message to it’s listeners.

And in the same year of 1961 who could forget Ben E. King’s hit song, Stand By Me. Which just over twenty years later would carry the title of a 1980’s cult classic movie. Starring River Phoenix, Corey Feldman, Jerry O’Connell, Kiefer Sutherland, John Cusack, and Wil Wheaton. The next year in 1962 kept the hits coming as Ray Charles reemerged, this time with three hit tracks: I Can’t Stop Loving You, You Don’t Know Me, and Your Cheatin Heart. But in 1963, not only was a Image result for martha and the vandellasyear in music, but the year president John F. Kennedy was assassinated. Such a heartfelt year brought joy, love, and sadness with the Shirelles, Foolish Little Girl. And who can forget in 1963 Heat Wave by Martha and The Vandellas. Then the following year 1964 came around with yet another tragedy. This time Malcolm X was assassinated at the Audubon Ballroom in Harlem.

Even with the tragedy, music kept being pumped out that year. Like The Four Tops, Baby I need your Loving, The Temptations with The Way You Do The Things You Do, The Supremes with Baby Love and Come See About Me, and Martha and The Vandellas returned with Dancing In The Streets. As with the groups, we saw Mary Wells come with the hit some My Guy and James Brown’s Please, Please, Please. Feeling the love of the 1960’s continued on into 1965 with songs like Sam Cooke’s Change Is Gonna Come. This hit song has Image result for marvin gayebeen replayed and remastered in numerous television shows, films, and theatre plays; adding to Sam Cooke’s already hit catalog. But you can’t talk great music of 1965 without including Marvin Gaye’s Aint That Peculiar and How Sweet It Is, The Four Tops Sugar Pie Honey Bunch, and James Brown I Feel Good and Poppa’s Got A Brand New Bag

That same year The Temptations brought us My Girl. Yet another song that would be the inspirational song behind a Hollywood movie. Starring Macaulay Culkin, Anna Chlumsky, Jamie Lee Curtis, and Dan Aykroyd. Meanwhile Martha and The Vandellas reminded us there’s Nowhere to Run and Nowhere To Hide adding to their catalog of hits. But let’s not forget Jr. Walker and The All Stars with Shotgun. As the we rounded past the mid 1960’s headed into the year 1966 hits continued to flow. Stevie Wonder let us know not to be “Uptight” cause everything’s going to be alright and Blowing In The Wind as Sam and Dave told us to Hold On, I’m Coming. As the year 1967 came we saw music from Aretha Franklin who taught us the value in be Respected and Natural Woman. As Jackie Wilson told us to reach Higher and Higher. The same year Sam and Dave gave us Soul Man.

1967 kept on with Gladys Knight and The Pips I Heard It Through The Grapevine and Smokey Robinson & The Miracles I Second That Emotion. The year of 1968 was off to yet another emotional round-block as two leaders were assassinated: Robert F. Kennedy and Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Hard Image result for jackson 5to believe music could keep coming. But it commenced with Marvin Gaye and Tammi Terrell with Aint Nothing Like The Real Thing,James Brown’s Say It Loud and I Got The Feeling, Otis Redding’s On The Dock Of The Bay. Then to round out the decade Marvin Gaye gave us his version of Heard It Through The Grapevine. We were also introduced to the Jackson 5 with I Want You Back. Throughout this decade there were highs and lows, but the music is what kept it all together. Above all, entertainment remained strong going into the 1970’s.

 

THE MEETING: BLACK PUBLIC FIGURES AND CRITICISM FOR MEETING TRUMP

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“We don’t want to meet, but we have to do something.”

As president elect, Donald J. Trump enters the White House, he is still being met with criticism. But now he’s recently encountered something else. Why, well it’s due to the recent statement he made against civil rights leader John Lewis. Lewis, an activist who marched with Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. during the Civil Rights Movement, has been, yet another individual who has made a push against Donald Trump. Trump is being criticized for what under normal circumstances would have been a simple throw away statement, has added to his already villainous persona. In addition to the criticism, numerous people have met with Trump in an attempt to connect to Trump regarding issues in America.

A few of those people have been public figures from the African American community. From hip hop artist Kanye West to former professional football players Jim Brown and Ray Lewis, and now comedian Steve Harvey. All of whom have faced criticism by the African American community for meeting with Trump. Now, outside of Kanye West, the others have played pivotal roles for years in making the lives of Black people in America better. Jim Brown has a program called, Amer-I-can, which aims at helping those, especially from the Black community, reach their full potential. As well as Steve Harvey who put together an annual retreat for young Black males who don’t have fathers in their lives.

So if these men have done so much, why are they receiving such flack from the Black community. Or better yet, why are we so hard on each other as a people? I am not a Trump supporter, yet it does not stop me from still standing behind these men in their attempt to create a joining of the minds. I understand the frustration of a lot of people, but in my opinion, he is the president now. You can not like him, wish he would have lost, or even not acknowledge him for the next four years. But rationally, what these men have done; isn’t that what you should try to do? Now, from a political standpoint, given the way our government is structured it’s going to be tough to get anything passed. But why is there so much frustration in trying.

On the side of the people, it is understood where their frustration comes from. Trump has indeed said a lot of things that he has been unapologetic about; some of which he shouldn’t have said or should have rephrased. So from that standpoint I understand the outrage. He has also publicly verbally attack the current president Barack Obama. A move that most have felt was because of President Obama’s ethnicity. Even with him stating he didn’t do it for those reasons, tensions still flare. But my only question to us as Black people is what should we do?

If Steve Harvey, Jim Brown, and Ray Lewis are attacked for attempting to reach out, then what. It’s a damned if you do, damned if you don’t position. Because if we don’t reach out, then we’re not using our platforms to try to bring about change. But if we meet up, then we’re soft shoeing and selling out. But like I said before, he is the president now. And how these men handled the situation is how you’re supposed to. You probably are asking why. The reason being, Black people have always had things held over us. You don’t vote, don’t expect to bring about changes. You don’t go to school, don’t expect to have a better quality of life.

Now I’m not saying what they did is a sure thing. But the fact that they did meet and he did offer to work with them, means leverage for the Democratic side. For a sitting U.S. president to have a private meeting with these men, and not even make an attempt in office speaks volumes to the party. Their meeting shouldn’t be necessarily about what he is going to do, but better yet getting a public statement out of him. Like I said before, no matter Democrat or Republican, anything is hard to get pushed through the system. But creating the dialogue sets precedent. Even Dr. King had to sit at the table with Lyndon B. Johnson who had no intentions on aiding the Civil Rights Movement. Lyndon even openly made controversial statements regarding Black people. But nonetheless, the conversation had to happen because Lyndon was the president.

In the end, we as Black people have to create some type of balance. If we don’t want to meet with the president, nor vote, then be prepared to not ask. We tend to ask for stuff from the very people we don’t want to converse with. We’ll push back against these men who met with him, but then what is the proper way. You can protest, then what? You can riot, then what? You can stay angry, then what? Because at the end of the day, when he leaves the White House, he’s still a billionaire. But our situation is unchanged as well. So as uncomfortable and irritating as it may seem, he his the leader for the next four years. And some form of conversation must be had because staying mad is not a viable decision.